Accident Reports
About Us News & Events Decades Memorabilia Trip Logs Photo Albums NAL Store Contact Us

NAL Accident Incidents

 

National Airlines System

Stinson SM-6000 Trimotor

Flight 1 1937

First flight of first stewardess Charlotte Georgie. On return flight to St. Petersburg , the aircraft made an emergency landing due to an engine problem. They landed in a farmer's muddy field with little damage to the airplane. Thankfully there were no injuries to the passengers or crew.

 

 

Sept. 13, 1945 Flight ? Tampa , FL

Date: 13 SEP 1945

Type: Lockheed 18 Lodestar

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: NC33349

Msn / C/n: 2370

Crew: ? fatalities / ? on board

Passengers: ? fatalities / ? on board

Total: ? fatalities / ? on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Tampa , FL ( United States of America )

Phase: Unknown

Nature: Unknown

Narrative:

Crashed on overshoot.

Lodestar NC33349 18-2370 Ex C-60A, 4255933

Overshot and skidded over seawall. Pilot removed from flying duties. Dispute over pilot's grounding led to 1948 pilot's strike.

Capt. Maston G. O'Neal, survived

Co-Pilot:

Stewardesses:

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19450913-0

 

Oct. 5, 1945 Flight 16 Lakeland , FL

Status: Final

Date: 05 OCT 1945

Time: 01:05

Type: Lockheed 18-50 Lodestar

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: NC18199

Msn / C/n: 2265

Year built: 1942

Total airframe hrs: 1798 hours

Engines: 2 Wright R-1820-G-202A

Crew: 0 fatalities / 3 on board

Passengers: 2 fatalities / 12 on board

Total: 2 fatalities / 15 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Lakeland , FL ( United States of America )

Phase: Landing

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Tampa , FL (TPA)

Destination airport: Lakeland , FL

Flight number: 16

Capt. Bill Conrad

Co-Pilot: W. M. Corry

Stewardesses:

Narrative:

Flight 16 departed Tampa at 00:45 and climbed to an altitude of 1500 feet. Approaching Lakeland , the pilots observed scattered stratus clouds over the lighted city of Lakeland , the airport however was clearly visible. A descent was established for a straight-in approach to the NE runway and when at an altitude of about 900 feet and approximately three or four miles from the field the captain extended the gear, put the mixture in automatic rich and reduced the manifold pressure to 20 inches. At an altitude of 700 feet the propellers were placed in low pitch and the landing lights were turned on. When about 2 miles from the field at 600 feet the flaps wore extended fully. Shortly thereafter the aircraft entered a cloud. Because of the unexpected presence of a cloud during the approach, the captain remarked to the first officer that he was going around again and retracted the wheels. Some power was applied and the flaps were started up at that time. The aircraft continued down the runway at an altitude of 30 or 40 feet. As it passed beyond the runway the throttles were opened to 45 inches of manifold pressure but the plane settled rapidly into the lake. The plane struck the surface of the water approximately 1000 feet beyond the runway shedding some fuselage covering and apparently skipped an additional 1000 feet where it sank in 10 feet of water.

PROABLE CAUSE: "On the basis of the foregoing the Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was faulty execution of a missed approach procedure resulting in settling of the aircraft into a water area beyond the landing runway."

Crashed Lakeland , FL ?

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19451005-0

 

Oct. 11, 1945 Flight 23 Banana River, FL ( Lake Parker )

Status: Final

Date: 11 OCT 1945

Time: 02:34

Type: Lockheed 18-50 Lodestar

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: NC15555

Msn / C/n: 2207

Total airframe hrs: 11396 hours

Engines: 2 Wright R-1820-G-202A

Crew: 0 fatalities / 2 on board

Passengers: 0 fatalities / 14 on board

Total: 0 fatalities / 16 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: near Banana River , FL ( United States of America )

Phase: Landing

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Jacksonville International Airport , FL (JAX)

Destination airport: Miami , FL

Flight number: 23

Capt. Samuel E. Stoia

Co-Pilot: William S. Blomeley

Stewardesses:

Narrative:

Flight 23 departed New York-La Guardia for Miami , FL , with scheduled stops at Raleigh , NC , and Jacksonville , FL. Until landing at Jacksonville , the flight had been of a routine nature. However, during the flight the captain paid particular attention to an oil leak from the right engine which could be seen across the top of the engine cowl. Although the leak appeared to be very slight and had not necessitated excessive refill at either New York or Raleigh . At Jacksonville two new oil hoses were replaced. At 01:23 the flight departed Jacksonville , on an instrument clearance to cruise at 2000 and later 4000 feet to Miami . At 02:10 , sparks were coming from the right engine. Upon inspecting the engine with a flashlight, it was observed that thick smoke was pouring from under the engine cowl and that a wide band of oil was streaming back over the top of the nacelle. Realizing the danger of an oil fire and being anxious to avoid damage to the engine in the event of complete loss of oil, the captain immediately shut the engine down and feathered the right propeller. He elected to continue to Melbourne , FL , about 15 miles away for an emergency landing.

Upon reaching Melbourne , however, the flight was advised by Melbourne Tower that the runway lights were inoperative and that considerable delay would be necessary before the mobile flood light apparatus would be available. The Lodestar then proceeded to Banana River , 11 miles north. As the flight approached the Banana River Naval Air Station, the captain observed that runway No. 6 was lighted, and being unable to establish radio contact with the tower, he assumed that it was the direction of landing intended. However, shortly before the aircraft arrived over the field, the tower personnel changed the runway lights to No. 15 since that runway was the longest one available at Banana River . The aircraft passed over the field at an altitude of 1500 feet, but the traffic pattern established by the flight was too close to the landing area, and, when on the final approach, the pilot realized he was too high for a landing. When over the edge of the field at 300 feet with full flaps and gear extended and the airspeed at 100 mph, the captain decided to go around for another approach. Forty inches of manifold pressure was applied with full low pitch, the gear was fully retracted, and the flaps were retracted to the 30% position. During the missed approach procedure the captain intentionally held a nose-low attitude in order to accelerate to a normal climb airspeed; however, in spite of the loss of altitude, no increase in airspeed indication was obtained, and the aircraft continued to lose altitude while maintaining a straight course. Approximately 1/2 mile south southeast of the field, the aircraft struck the ground in a fairly level attitude longitudinally. The right wing made the first impact, the aircraft subsequently turning approximately 270 degrees as it skidded to a stop.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "On the basis of the foregoing the Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was an excessively hurried approach for an emergency single-engine landing and the faulty execution of a missed approach procedure. The came of engine malfunction was faulty installation of an oil hose and connecting clamp. A contributing factor to the accident was the failure of the company to maintain an adequate training program for pilot personnel and to provide the facilities required for such a program." Force landing Banana River , FL

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19451011-0

 

October 2, 1950 Cargo flight Washington-National Airport , DC (DCA)

Status: Final

Date: 02 OCT 1950

Time: 23:53

Type: Curtiss C-46F-1-CU

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N1661M

Msn / C/n: 22544

Year built: 1945

Crew: 0 fatalities / 2 on board

Passengers: 0 fatalities / 0 on board

Total: 0 fatalities / 2 on board

Airplane damage: Substantial

Location: Washington-National Airport , DC (DCA) ( United States of America )

Phase: Landing

Nature: Cargo

Departure airport: Newark International Airport , NJ (EWR)

Destination airport: Washington-National Airport , DC (DCA)

Narrative:

The C-46 departed Newark Airport at 22:40 VFR for Washington . The flight proceeded to Washington at an altitude of 6,000 feet. Over the Relay radio range intersection, the flight was cleared by the control tower to enter the traffic pattern for landing on Runway 36. The wind was reported to be calm; visibility was 3 miles; and the sky was clear. A left traffic pattern was entered approximately 1 1/2 miles northeast of the field at an altitude of 1,200 feet. From there the flight proceeded westerly so as to circle the Washington National Airport to the left for an approach to Runway 36. Just before passing over Hains Point, the Before Landing check was accomplished. The landing gear was extended; flaps were lowered one quarter; and air speed was reduced to between 130 and 135 mph. Immediately after the aircraft passed over Hains Point, at a point about one mile northeast of the approach end of Runway 18, the crew stated that fuel pressure for the right engine dropped to zero and the right engine lost power. Power settings for the left engine were immediately increased to the maximum for continuous operation, and the landing gear and flaps were retracted. The copilot continued to fly the aircraft from the left side while the captain examined the cockpit with a flashlight to determine why the right engine had failed. No reason could be found in the cockpit for the engine failure and since the right engine did not restart, the captain feathered its propeller. By this time the aircraft had been flown beyond Runway 18, and since it seemed that altitude could not be maintained, a left turn was made for landing on Runway 15. Contact with Runway 15 was made at its intersection with Runway 18. The aircraft slid on the bottom surfaces of the fuselage, engine nacelles, and landing gear doors, for a distance of 1,750 feet, then came to rest on the runway 660 feet from the end. There was no fire.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the confusion of the crew because of lack of familiarity with the C-46 which resulted in a wheels-up landing half-way down the runway."

A wheels-up landing half-way down the runway

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19501002-1

 

January 14, 1951 Flight 83 Philadelphia , PA

Status: Final

Date: 14 JAN 1951

Time: 14:13

Type: Douglas DC-4-1009

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N74685

Msn / C/n: 43102

Year built: 1947

Engines: 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2000-D-3

Crew: 1 fatality / 3 on board

Passengers: 6 fatalities / 25 on board

Total: 7 fatalities / 28 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Philadelphia International Airport , PA (PHL) ( United States of America )

Phase: Landing

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Newark International Airport , NJ (EWR)

Destination airport: Philadelphia International Airport , PA (PHL)

Flight number0: 83

Capt. Howell C. Barwick, survived

Co-pilot Edward J. Zatarain, survived

Stewardesses: Mary Frances "Frankie" Housley, (dec.)

Narrative:

National Airlines Flight 83 departed Newark at 13:33 for Norfolk with a scheduled stop at Philadelphia . At 13:54 the flight reported over Northeast Philadelphia at 4,000 feet and was cleared by Approach Control to descend, crossing the Philadelphia range station at 3,000 feet. It was also advised that the altitude was unrestricted after passing the range station, and that it was cleared to make a straight-in approach to Runway 9 With the above clearance, local weather was given precipitation ceiling 500 feet, sky obscured, visibility 1, 1/4 miles, snow and smoke, and wind south-southwest two miles per hour. Following this clearance, the flight descended and reported over the Philadelphia range station at 3,000 feet, was again cleared for an approach to Runway 9, and was advised to report leaving thousand-foot levels. The flight acknowledged and reported leaving 3,000 feet at 14:04 , but no report of leaving 2,000 feet was received by Approach Control. According to the captain, they then proceeded to the outer marker and executed a procedure turn. At 14:08 the flight reported over the outer marker, inbound, and stated that it was at 1,600 feet and descending. A clearance was immediately reissued to land on Runway 9, and the wind was given as south-southwest, three miles per hour. The flight was advised that the glide path was inoperative, that a 2,000-foot extension to the west end of the runway was under construction, and that braking action on Runway 9 was poor-to-fair. According to tower personnel this transmission was acknowledged. The crew, however, stated that they did not receive it. The flight continued its approach past the middle marker to the airport, and was first observed by ground witnesses beneath the overcast and directly over the intersection of Runways 4/22 and 9/27, located approximately 1,200 feet east of the threshold of Runway 9. The aircraft was next seen to descend steeply, flare out for a landing in a normal manner, and float a considerable distance. After making contact with the runway the aircraft continued straight ahead, passed beyond the end of the runway, and crashed into a ditch at the east boundary of the airport. Fire immediately followed.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The captain's error in judgment in landing the aircraft too far down the slippery runway instead of executing a missed approach procedure."

 

The plane overshot the landing, ran into a ditch and caught fire. Pilot error in electing to land long, on a wet and snow covered runway instead of executing a missed approach.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19510114-0

 

 

 

Feb 11, 1952 Flight 101 Elizabeth, NJ

Status: Final

Date: 11 FEB 1952

Time: 00:20

Type: Douglas DC-6

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N90891

Msn / C/n: 43055/37

Year built: 1947

Engines: 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-CA15

Crew: 3 fatalities / 4 on board

Passengers: 26 fatalities / 59 on board

Total: 29 fatalities / 63 on board

Ground casualties: 4 fatalities

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Newark International Airport , NJ (EWR) ( United States of America )

Phase: En route

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Newark International Airport , NJ (EWR)

Destination airport: Miami International Airport , FL (MIA)

Flightnumber: 101

apt. Wayne Foster, (dec.)

Co-Pilot: Carney St. Clair, (dec.)

Flight Engineer: Ira Shea, (dec.)

Stewardesses: Nancy Taylor (survived)

Narrative:

At 00:13 Newark Control Tower gave the flight taxi clearance to Runway 24, stating the wind was south, variable at six mph, and altimeter 29.92. At approximately 00:17 the flight advised the tower that it was ready for takeoff. Take-off clearance was issued, and the controller observed the aircraft taxi into take-off position and proceed down the runway in a normal manner, becoming airborne at 00:18 after a roll of approximately 3,200 feet. The climb-out appeared normal until the aircraft passed the vicinity of the Newark Range Station. At that point the nr. 3 propeller reversed in flight. The plane veered to the right. Since it occurred at low altitude end low airspeed the crew did not have much time to make a correct analysis of the difficulty. Their attention might well have been directed to the outboard (nr. 4) engine which in the event of loss of power would produce a more severe yaw than would an inboard engine. The pilot then decided to feather the nr.4 propeller and the copilot radioed: "I lost an engine and am returning to the field." The flight was immediately cleared to land on runway 6, which clearance was at once amended to land on any runway desired. The DC-4 lost altitude and crashed in Elizabeth near the intersection of Scotland Road and Westminster Avenue .

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The reversal in flight of no.3 propeller with relatively high power and the subsequent feathering of no.4 propeller resulting in a descent at an altitude too low to effect recovery." C

The aircraft crashed into an apartment building on takeoff from Newark International Airport after an in-flight reversal of the no.3 prop, and untimely feathering of the no.4 prop by the crew.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19520211-0

 

Feb. 14, 1953 Flight 470 Gulf of Mexico (near Mobile , AL )

Status: Final

The aircraft crashed into the Gulf of Mexico after in-flight loss of a wing in a thunderstorm.

Date: 14 FEB 1953

Time: 17:10

Type: Douglas DC-6

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N90893

Msn / C/n: 43057/73

Year built: 1947

Total airframe hrs: 15994 hours

Engines: 4 Pratt & Whitney R-2800-CB16

Crew: 5 fatalities / 5 on board

Passengers: 41 fatalities / 41 on board

Total: 46 fatalities / 46 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: 35 km (21.9 mls) off Mobile , AL , USA [ Gulf of Mexico ] ( Atlantic Ocean )

Phase: En route

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Tampa International Airport , FL (TPA)

Destination airport: Orlando International Airport , FL (MCO)

Flightnumber: 470

46 passengers (incl. 5 crew)

Capt. Ernest “Ernie” A. Springer (dec.)

Co-Pilot: C. T. Stettner (dec.)

Flight Engineer: E. Campion (dec.)

Stewardesses:

Betty Baucom, Hired 9/6/50 (dec.)

Lillian Blameuser, Hired 11/22/49 , (dec.)

Narrative:

Flight 470 originated at Miami , for New Orleans , with one stop scheduled at Tampa . From Miami the VFR flight was uneventful, with departure at 14:15 , with the Tampa landing at 15:15 . The flight took off from Tampa at 15:43 for an IFR flight across the Gulf of Mexico to New Orleans . Cruising altitude was FL145. At 16:49 , Flight 470 reported passing over NA-2 check point at 16:45 at 14,500 feet, and estimated being over NA-1 at 17:10 . It also reported, "Thunderstorms all quadrants..." Pensacola radio received and acknowledged this message, and advised the flight of "severe turbulence" between NA-1 and New Orleans as reported by a DC-6 crew that had landed ahead of Flight 470. At 16:54 , the flight advised Pensacola that it was reducing power because of turbulence and five minutes later requested Air Route Traffic Control clearance to descend from 14,500 feet to 4,500 feet. This was granted within a minute or so. At 17:03 , the Flight advised Pensacola of passing through 10,000 feet, and at 17:12 , advised that it had reached 4,500 feet at 17:10 . Pensacola repeated this message back to the flight and gave it the 16:48 New Orleans special weather: measured 800 feet overcast, visibility 10 miles, wind north-northeast 25 mph, with gusts to 34, the altimeter 29.61; barometer unsteady. The flight acknowledged and there were no further radio contacts. The aircraft had apparently crashed in the Gulf of Mexico . Some wreckage and bodies were found the next day, but the majority of the wreckage was found on May 20.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The loss of control followed by the in-flight failure and separation of portions of the airframe structure while the aircraft was traversing an intense frontal-wave type storm of extremely severe turbulence, the severity and location of which the pilot had not been fully informed."

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19530214-0

 

 

Jan 10, 1955 Flight St. Petersburg , FL

Lodestar NC33369 18-22414 Ex C-60A, 42-32220

Lost control and burned

Capt. Marshall Hope

Co-Pilot:

Flight Engineer:

Stewardesses:

 

Oct. 20, 1956 Flight Tallahassee , FL

Lodestar NC33368 18-2372 Ex C-60A, 42-55935

Landed too fast, too far down runway, ground- looped through ditch and into trees.

Capt. Gordon R. Pendleton

Co-Pilot: Benjamin H. Dawson

Flight Engineer:

Stewardesses:

 

Nov. 16, 1959 Flight 967 Gulf of Mexico off Pilottown, LA.,

Date: 16 NOV 1959

Time: 00:55 CST

Type: Douglas DC-7B

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N4891C

Msn / C/n: 45355/922

Year built: 1958

Total airframe hrs: 6578 hours

Crew: 6 fatalities / 6 on board

Passengers: 36 fatalities / 36 on board

Total: 42 fatalities / 42 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Gulf of Mexico ( United States of America )

Phase: En route

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Tampa International Airport , FL (TPA)

Destination airport: New Orleans International Airport , LA (MSY)

Flight number: 967

Narrative:

Flight 967 took off from Tampa at 23:32 for a flight to New Orleans at FL140. At 00:55 the aircraft suddenly crashed into the Gulf of Mexico . An unlawful act was investigated, but not proven. The aircraft owned by Delta Air Lines, but operated by National Airlines.

A Delta Air Lines DC-7Bm N4891C (S/N 45355) operating as National-Delta-American interchange Flight 967

Capt. Frank E. Todd (43), dec.

Co-Pilot: Richard S. Beebee (34), dec.

Flight Engineer: George H. Clark (31), dec.

Stewardesses: Patricia Hires (23), DOH 02/08/57 , dec

Donna Jean Osburn (20), DOH 06/26/59 , dec

Crashed into the Gulf of Mexico off Pilottown , LA. , Nov. 15, 1959 .

The aircraft was on the National portion of the interchange and had a National crew on board. This has often been listed in reports on this accident as a National DC-7B; however, it was a Delta Plane. Sabotage was strongly suspected as the probable cause of the accident.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "Because of the lack of physical evidence, the probable cause of this accident is unknown."

42 (incl. 5 crew)

The aircraft crashed into the water for unknown reasons.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19591116-1

 

Jan. 6, 1960 Flight 2511 Bolivia , NC

(Wednesday)

Date: 06 JAN 1960

Time: 02:38 EST

Type: Douglas DC-6B

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N8225H

Msn / C/n: 43742/300

Year built: 1952

Crew: 5 fatalities / 5 on board

Passengers: 29 fatalities / 29 on board

Total: 34 fatalities / 34 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: 2,4 km (1.5 mls) from Bolivia , NC ( United States of America )

Phase: En route

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: New York-Idlewild International Airport, NY (JFK)

Destination airport: Miami International Airport , FL (MIA)

Flight number: 2511

Capt. Dale Southard (45), dec.

Co-Pilot: Richard L. Hentzell (32), dec.

Flight Engineer: Robert R. Halleckson (35), dec.

Stewardesses: Marilu L. Odell (23), DOH 11/1/57 , dec.

Valerie E. Stewart (25), DOH 11/1/57 , dec.

Narrative:

The DC-6 was one of two aircraft substituted for a Boeing 707 which had incurred mechanical difficulty. En route to Miami the aircraft disintegrated in flight. Portions of the wreckage fell near Kura Beach and the major wreckage fell about 13 miles West of Kura Beach. It appeared that a dynamite explosion had occurred which was detonated by means of dry cell batteries. The explosion occurred near the right of seat row 7.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The accident was caused by the detonation of dynamite within the passenger cabin."

The aircraft exploded at 18,000 feet following the detonation of a dynamite bomb. A passenger, Julian Frank, who had purchased a large quantity of life insurance just before the trip, committed suicide by detonating the bomb in his lap.
http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19600106-0

Footnote: Martha Alexander told me that she had talked the girls into taking this trip and always carried the guilt.

 

 

Nov 15, 1961 . Flight 429 Boston , MA

Date: 15 NOV 1961

Time: 17:10 EST

Type: Douglas DC-6B

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N8228H

Msn / C/n: 43821/316

Year built: 1953

Crew: 0 fatalities / 5 on board

Passengers: 0 fatalities / 25 on board

Total: 0 fatalities / 30 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Boston-Logan International Airport , MA (BOS) ( United States of America )

Phase: Takeoff

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Boston-Logan International Airport , MA (BOS)

Destination airport: New York-Idlewild International Airport, NY (JFK)

Flight number: 429

Capt. Clarence “Bud” Hofer

Co-Pilot:

Flight Engineer:

Stewardesses: Patty Kicklighter

Narrative:

Northeast Flight 120, a Vickers Viscount, arrived near Boston and was cleared to land on runway 4R. During the landing rollout a DC-6, National Airlines Flight 429, was attempting to takeoff from runway 9. Both aircraft collided.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The Board finds this ground collision accident occurred as the result of commencement of takeoff by National 429 without clearance. Contributing factors were the failure of tower personnel to provide adequate surveillance of the active runway and to issue an appropriate warning message to the pilot of National 429 alerting him to the impending traffic confliction."

(Sold as spares to AAXICO)

"The Board finds this ground collision accident occurred as the result of commencement of takeoff by National 429 without clearance. Contributing factors were the failure of tower personnel to provide adequate surveillance of the active runway and to issue an appropriate warning message to the pilot of National 429 alerting him to the impending traffic confliction."

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19611115-0

 

 

May 15, 1963 Flight Miami , FL

Lockheed Prop Jet Electra N5013K MSN#1146 Del NA Jan 6, 1961.

Belly-landed MIA.

Sold Pan Aero Int'l. Corp Feb. 8, 1968

Capt. Tom Sutor

Co-Pilot:Kenneth I. Carlisle

Stewardesses:

 

 

Title: National Airlines, Inc., Boeing 747-135, N77722, near Lake Charles , Louisiana , January 4, 1972 .
NTSB Report Number: AAR-72-21, adopted on 07/12/1972
NTIS Report Number: PB-211474

 

 

 

03 November 1973 Flight 27 over Albuquerque , New Mexico , USA

Status: Final

Date: 03 NOV 1973

Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N60NA

Msn / C/n: 46700/14

Year built: 1971

Total airframe hrs: 5954 hours

Crew: 0 fatalities / 12 on board

Passengers: 1 fatality / 116 on board

Total: 1 fatality / 128 on board

Airplane damage: Substantial

Location: near Socorro , NM ( United States of America )

Phase: En route

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Houston-Intercontinental Airport , TX (IAH)

Destination airport: Las Vegas - McCarran International Airport , NV (LAS)

Flightnumber: 27

Crew:

Captain:

Copilot

Flt. Engineer:

Flight Attendants:

Narrative:

National Airlines Flight 27 departed Houston for Las Vegas and climbed to FL390. Suddenly the No. 3 engine fan assembly disintegrated and fragments penetrated the fuselage the Nos. 1 and 2 engine nacelles, and the right wing area. As a result, the cabin depressurized and one cabin window, which was struck by a fragment of the fan assembly, separated from the fuselage. The passenger who was sitting next to that window was forced through the opening and ejected from the aircraft. The flight crew initiated an emergency descent, and the aircraft landed safely at Albuquerque International Airport 19 minutes after engine failed.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The disintegration of the No. 3 engine fan assembly as a result of an interaction between the fan blade tips and the fan case. The fan-tip rub condition was caused by the acceleration of the engine to an abnormally high fan speed which initiated a multiwave, vibratory resonance within the fan section of the engine. The precise reason or reasons for the acceleration and the onset of the destructive vibration could not be determined conclusively."

NTSB Report Number: AAR-75-02, adopted on 01/15/1975
NTIS Report Number: PB-239889/AS

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19731103-0

 

 

McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10 N60NA MSN# 46700

The aircraft's no.1 engine exploded after overspeeding caused by the crew's experimenting with the auto-throttle system. Shrapnel from the engine struck the fuselage, breaking a window, and leading to an explosive decompression in which one passenger was ejected from the aircraft. The plane landed safely at ABQ after an emergency descent.

 

Title: National Airlines, Inc., McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10, N60NA, near Tampa , Florida , July 8, 1974 .
NTSB Report Number: AAR-74-09, adopted on 07/24/1974
NTIS Report Number: PB-234791/2GA

 

 

May 8, 1978 Flight 193 Pensacola/Gulf of Mexico

Status: Final

Date: 08 MAY 1978

Time: 21:20 CDT

Type: Boeing 727-235

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N4744

Msn / C/n: 19464/553

Year built: Del NA Mar. 27, 1968

Total airframe hrs: 26720 hours

Engines: 3 Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7B

Crew: 0 fatalities / 6 on board

Passengers: 3 fatalities / 52 on board

Total: 3 fatalities / 58 on board

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Escambia Bay , FL ( United States of America )

Phase: Approach

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: Mobile Municipal Airport , AL (MOB)

Destination airport: Pensacola Regional Airport , FL (PNS)

Flight number: 193

Capt. George T. Kunz, (DOH 11/12/56 )

Co-Pilot: Leonard G. Sanderson, Jr. (DOH 12/20/76 )

Flight Engineer: James K. Stockwell (DOH 06/02/69 )

Flight Attendant: Carol J. Crawford DOH 03/16/68

Deborah Pinholster Verplanck DOH 08/26/70

Carl “ Tex ” Greenwood , Jr., DOH 06/28/77

Narrative:

Flight 193 operated as a scheduled passenger from Miami to Pensacola , FL , with en route stops at Melbourne and Tampa , New Orleans , Louisiana , and Mobile . About 21:02 CDT the flight departed Mobile on an IFR flight plan to Pensacola and climed to the cruising altitude of 7,000 feet. At 21:09 , the crew were told that they would be vectored for an airport surveillance radar (ASR) approach to runway 25. At 21:13 , the radar controller told National 193 that it was 11 nm NW of the airport and cleared it to descend and maintain 1700 feet. At 21:17 flaps were selected at 15deg and two minutes later the flight was cleared to descend to 1500 feet and shortly after that further down to the MDA (480 feet). As the aircraft rolled out on the final approach heading, the captain called for the landing gear and the landing final checklist. At 21:20:15 , the ground proximity warning system (GPWS) whooper warning continued for nine seconds until the first officed silenced the warning. Nine seconds later the 727 hit the water with gear down and flaps at 25deg. It came to rest in about 12 feet of water. The weather at the time of the accident was 400 feet overcast, 4 miles visibility in fog and haze, wind 190deg/7kts.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The flightcrew's unprofessionally conducted nonprecision instrument approach, in that the captain and the crew failed to monitor the descent rate and altitude, and the first officer failed to provide the captain with required altitude and approach performance callouts. The captain and first officer did not check or utilize all instruments available for altitude awareness and, therefore, did not configure the aircraft properly and in a timely manner for the approach. The captain failed to comply with the company's GPWS flightcrew response procedures in a timely manner after the warning began. The flight engineer turned off the GPWS warning 9 seconds after it began without the captain' s knowledge or consent. Contributing to the accident was the radar controller's failure to provide advance notice of the start-descent point which accelerated the pace of the crew's cockpit activities after the passage of the final approach fix."

There were 58 aboard the jet, there were three fatal injuries.

Ditched in Escambia Bay , Pensacola , FL One passenger drowned.

To Am Jet Ind. in 1978 as N58AJ.

 

The aircraft crashed into Pensacola Bay , 3 miles short of the runway, while executing a non-precision approach to land at the Pensacola Regl. Airport. Pilot error in failing to maintain MDA (minimum descent altitude) until the runway environment was in sight.

 

http://dnausers.d-n-a.net/dnetGOjg/080578.htm

July 9, 1982 Flight PAA 759 Kenner , LA

 

Status: Final

Date: 09 JUL 1982

Time: 16:08 CDT

Type: Boeing 727-235

Operator: Pan American World Airways

Registration: N4737 (From NAL to PAA Jan.7, 1980, in NAA/PAA merger.)

Msn / C/n: 19457/518

Year built: First Flight Jan.24, 1968. Del NA Jan 31, 1968

Engines: 3 Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7B

Crew: 7 fatalities / 7 on board

Passengers: 138 fatalities / 138 on board

Total: 145 fatalities / 145 on board

145 Aboard / 153 Fatal (8 on ground)

Ground casualties: 8 fatalities

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: New Orleans , LA ( United States of America )

Phase: Initial climb

Nature: Domestic Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: New Orleans International Airport , LA (MSY)

Destination airport: Las Vegas - McCarran International Airport , NV (LAS)

Flight number: 759

Capt. Kenny McCullers, dec. DOH 08/16/65 aged 45

Co-Pilot: Donald Pierce, dec. DOH 06/20/76 aged 32

Flight Engineer: Leo B. Noone, dec. DOH 06/19/67 aged 60

Flight Attendants: Lucille V. (Brown) Oumbres, DOH 10/30/70 ; dec.

Vivian L. Ford, DOH 7/07/72 dec.

James P. Fijut, DOH 10/30/73 dec.

 

Narrative:

Flight 759 took off from runway 10 for Las Vegas after the intermediate stop at New Orleans . The Boeing climbed to 95-150 feet when it began to descend. It struck some trees 2376 feet past the runway end and crashed in a residential area, demolishing 6 houses.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The airplane's encounter during the lift-off and initial climb phase of flight with a micro-burst induced windshear which imposed a downdraft and a decreasing headwind, the effects of which the pilot would have had difficulty recognizing and reacting to in time for the airplane's descent to be arrested before its impact with trees. Contributing to the accident was the limited capability of current ground based low level windshear detection technology to provide definitive guidance for controllers and pilots for use in avoiding low level wind shear encounters."




The aircraft crashed during a thunderstorm, 29 seconds after taking off from New Orleans International Airport . The plane reached an altitude of 95 to 150 feet and then began to descend and crashed into trees and houses bursting into flames. Microburst induced windshear. Limited capability of current ground-based low-level windshear detection technology.
http://amelia.db.erau.edu/reports/ntsb/aar/AAR83-02.pdf

http://dnausers.d-n-a.net/dnetGOjg/090782.txt

Report No. NTSB-AAR-83-02 Report Date: March 21, 1983 Pages: 119   On July 9, 1982 , Pan American World Airways, Inc., Flight 759 (Clipper 759), a Boeing 727-235, N4737, was a regularly scheduled passenger flight from Miami , Florida , to Las Vegas , Nevada , with an en route stop at New Orleans , Louisiana . About 1607:57 central daylight time, Clipper 759, with 7 crewmembers, 1 nonrevenue passenger on the cockpit jumpseat, and 137 passengers on board, began its takeoff from runway 10 at the New Orleans International Airport, Kenner, Louisiana.   At the time of Flight 759's takeoff, there were showers over the east end of the airport and to the east of the airport along the airplane's intended takeoff path. The winds at the time were gusty, variable, and swirling. Clipper 759 lifted off the runway, climbed to an altitude of between 95 feet to about 150 feet above the ground, and then began to descend. The airplane struck a line of trees about 2,376 feet beyond the departure end of runway 10 at an altitude of about 50 feet above the ground. The airplane continued on an eastward track for another 2,234 feet hitting trees and houses and then crashed in a residential area about 4,610 feet from the end of the runway.   The airplane was destroyed during the impact, explosion, and subsequent ground fire. One hundred forty-five persons on board the airplane and 8 persons on the ground were killed in the crash. Six houses were destroyed; five houses were damaged substantially.   The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the airplane's encounter during the liftoff and initial climb phase of flight with a microburst-induced wind shear which imposed a downdraft and a decreasing headwind, the effects of which the pilot would have had difficulty recognizing and reacting to in time for the airplaneUs descent to be arrested before its impact with trees.   Contributing to the accident was the limited capability of current ground-based low-level wind shear detection technology to provide definitive guidance for controllers and pilots for use in avoiding low- level wind shear encounters.

 

 

Status: Final

Date: 21 DEC 1988

Time: 19:03

Type: Boeing 747-121A

Operator: Pan American World Airways

Registration: N739PA

Msn / C/n: 19646/15

Year built: 1970

Total airframe hrs: 72464 hours

Cycles: 16497 cycles

Engines: 4 Pratt & Whitney JT9D-7A

Crew: 16 fatalities / 16 on board

Passengers: 243 fatalities / 243 on board

Total: 259 fatalities / 259 on board

Ground casualties: 11 fatalities

Airplane damage: Written off

Location: Lockerbie ( United Kingdom )

Phase: En route

Nature: International Scheduled Passenger

Departure airport: London-Heathrow Airport (LHR)

Destination airport: New York-John F. Kennedy International Airport, NY (JFK)

Narrative:

Former NAL F/E Jerry Avritt killed 16 crew 243 passengers 11 on the ground

   

Flight PA103 departed London-Heathrow runway 27R for New York at 18:25 . The aircraft levelled off at FL310 31 minutes later. At 19:03 Shanwick Oceanic Control transmitted an oceanic clearance. At that time an explosion occurred in the aircraft's forward cargo hold at position 4L. The explosive forces produced a large hole in the fuselage structure and disrupted the main cabin floor. Major cracks continued to propagate from the large hole while containers and items of cargo ejected through the hole, striking the empennage, left- and right tail plane. The forward fuselage and flight deck area separated when the aircraft was in a nose down and left roll attitude, peeling away to the right at Station 800. The nose section then knocked the no. 3 engine off its pylon. The remaining aircraft disintegrated while it was descending nearly vertically from 19000 feet to 9000 feet. A section of cabin floor and baggage hold (from approx. Station 1241-1920) fell onto housing at Rosebank Terrace, Lockerbie. The main wing structure struck the ground with a high yaw angle at Sherwood Crescent , Lockerbie causing a massive fire.

The Semtex bomb which caused the explosion had probably been hidden in a radio cassette player and was transferred to PA103 from a Pan Am Boeing 727 flight, arriving from Frankfurt . The Polular Front for the Liberation of Palestine General Command (PFLP-GC) was probably the organisation responsible for the bombing.

 

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The in-flight disintegration of the aircraft was caused by the detonation of an improvised explosive device located in a baggage container positioned on the left side of the forward cargo hold at aircraft station 700."

Related information/accidents:

Security - Sabotage (bomb)

Airplane - Airframe - Fuselage

Result - Crash out of control

 

 

PAM AM 103

Aircraft Accident Report No 2/90 EW/C1094   All times in this report are UTC

Synopsis

The accident was notified to the Air Accidents Investigation Branch at 19.40 hrs on the 21 December 1988 and the investigation commenced that day. The members of the AAIB team are listed in Appendix A.

The aircraft, Flight PA 103 from London Heathrow to New York , had been in level crusing flight at level 310 (31,000 feet) for approximately seven minutes when the last secondary radar return was received just before 19.03 hrs. The radar then showed multiple primary returns fanning out downwind. Major portions of the wreckage of the aircraft fell on the town of Lockerbie with other large parts landing in the countryside to the west of the town. Lighter debris from the aircraft was stewn along two trails, the longest of which extended some 130 kilometres to the east coast of England . Within a few days items of wreckage were retrieved upon which forensic scientists found conclusive evidence of a detonating high explosive. The airport security and criminal aspects of the accident are the subject of a seperate investigation and are not covered in this report which concentrates on the technical aspects of the disintergration of the aircraft.

The report concludes that the detonation of an improvised explosive device led directly to the destruction of the aircraft with the loss of all 259 persons on board and 11 of the residents of the town of Lockerie . Five recommendations are made of which four concern flight recorders, including the funding of a study to devise methods of recording violent positive and negative pressure pulses associated with explosions. The final recommendation is that Airworthiness Autorities and aircraft manufacturers undertake a systematic study with a view to identifying measures that might migate the effects of explosive devices and improve the tolerance of the aircraft's structure and systems to explosive damage.

Link to full Aircraft Accident Report